All We Want is Agency Over Our Bodies

Latinx women are fighting the good fight for reproductive justice

The Latina Institute
ZORA
Published in
4 min readJun 27, 2019

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Credit: SOPA Images/Getty Images

JJune 27 marks three years since the Supreme Court decided Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, the most significant abortion case in two decades. The ruling struck down a Texas law that placed medically unnecessary regulations on abortion providers, intended to force them to close under the guise of women’s health. The Court’s decision recognized that individuals seeking an abortion would be forced to shoulder excessive burdens in the aftermath of the law and reaffirmed our constitutional right. Nevertheless, we know that a right in theory is not always one in fact and does not ensure access, especially for underserved communities.

The decision was a major victory for those of us fighting to protect access to abortion, but in the three years between the 2013 law passing and the 2016 Supreme Court ruling, more than half of the abortion clinics in Texas had already shut down. Few have opened since. Texans in some cities have to travel 300 miles one-way to get care, which, for people with fewer resources, is logistically or financially impossible. Many undocumented women in Texas face border patrol checkpoints en route that stand between them and the remaining clinics.

TThis week also marks one year since Justice Anthony Kennedy’s announcement that he would step down from his Supreme Court seat, making way for Brett Kavanaugh to shift the balance of the court against abortion. Kavanaugh’s history of ruling against reproductive rights as a federal judge has emboldened anti-abortion politicians in state legislatures across the country to pass increasingly extreme restrictions that they know are unconstitutional in an attempt to bring a case to the Supreme Court and overturn Roe v. Wade.

Thirty-three states and D.C. ban abortion coverage in their public health programs and 11 states ban private insurance plans from covering abortion, making it that much harder to afford one.

Latinx communities and communities of color are always the most impacted by restricted access to abortion. We often work multiple jobs and are paid less for the…

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The Latina Institute
ZORA
Writer for

National Latina Institute for Reproductive Justice builds Latina/x power for salud, dignidad, y justicia. Join us. #SoyPoderosa