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ZORA
Unapologetic. Ours. A publication from Medium for Black women.

Zora Celebrates

In ZORA. More on Medium.

Photo Illustration: Save As/Medium; Source: Artist Carrie Mae Weems at Jack Shainman Gallery in New York in 2016. Photo: Photo: Stephanie Diani/The New York Times/Redux

Carrie Mae Weems is widely considered to be one of the most influential contemporary artists of recent history. While she is best known for her photography, Weems also works in text, fabric, audio, digital images, and installation video. She’s a recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship (or “Genius Grant”), the first Black woman to have a retrospective at the Guggenheim and has even been cited as an influence for Beyonce’s “Lemonade” visuals.

Weem’s work primarily features Black subjects…


Photo of Mariame Kaba on the left with the words “ZORA CELEBRATES MARIAME KABA” on the right against a gray/black/lime-green blurred background.
Photo of Mariame Kaba on the left with the words “ZORA CELEBRATES MARIAME KABA” on the right against a gray/black/lime-green blurred background.
Photo Illustration: Save As/Medium; Source: Gioncarlo Valentine

Mariame Kaba is an organizer and educator whose work focuses on restorative justice, advocating for youth, ending violence, and dismantling the prison industrial complex (PIC). She has long been vocal in the movement to abolish police and prisons, a movement that gained notoriety in 2020 after the death of George Floyd at the hands of police officers and the subsequent protests.

“As a society, we have been so indoctrinated with the idea that we solve problems by policing and caging people that many cannot imagine anything other than prisons and the police as solutions to violence and harm,” she wrote…


Photo Illustration: Save As/Medium; Source: Bob Fitch Photography Archive, Department of Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries


Photo Illustration: Save As/Medium; Source: Getty | Michael Ochs Archives / Stringer


Photo Illustration: Save As/Medium; Source: Getty | Afro Newspaper/Gado

“It is not that I dwell on the past. But the past shapes the way we are in the present and the way we will become what we are destined to become.” from “Death of Innocence: The Story of the Hate Crime that Changed America

Mamie Till-Mobley (November 23, 1921–January 6, 2003) was an American educator and activist and the mother of Emmett Till, who was lynched in Mississippi at the age of 14 for allegedly flirting with a White woman. For his funeral in Chicago, Mamie Till Mobley insisted that her son’s casket be left open because, in her…

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