How you can help pass the For the People Act

Photo Credit | Benjamin Lowy Getty Images

According to MSNBC : “Stacey Abrams has launched her ‘Hot Call Summer’ campaign to get Congress to pass the For the People Act. The ‘Hot Call Summer’ campaign asks supporters to call their U.S. …


True to its origins, this year’s Juneteenth combines incremental victory and continued struggle.

A woman wipes away tears after the names of Black people killed by police were read while marching to mark the Juneteenth holiday June 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

So finally, the U.S. is getting a national holiday dedicated to the emancipation of our enslaved ancestors. But it’s happening amid a concerted right-wing effort…


Was the summer of 2020 a wake-up call, a reckoning or a revolution?

The summer of 2020 brought with it protest after protest after protest. But to what end? Photo: Getty Images


Once again racism rears its ugly head when it comes to Meghan Markle, Prince Harry, and their kids

Meghan Markle in 2020. Photo: Getty Images

Earlier this week, royal watchers received their answer. Lilibet “Lili” Diana Mountbatten-Windsor was born on Friday, June 4 at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, weighing in at 7 pounds and 11 ounces, according to an announcement on Harry and Meghan’s Archewell website. A fine name if you ask me, especially considering how the first name is a…


It Has to Be Said

Mo’Nique’s ‘auntie’ comments prop up supremacist standards

Remember Little House on the Prairie and the bonnets the White women wore? Historic head coverings weren’t a problem for real or fictional White women. Why are they a problem for Black women? Image: Getty.

I have worn everything except a bonnet out of the house, but I guarantee you that my personal choice of leaving it in the dresser hasn’t saved me from…


GEORGE FLOYD: ONE YEAR LATER

Mainstream support for Black Lives Matter has waned. But for Black people, the fight continues — and so does the agony.

A makeshift memorial for George Floyd fills with flowers and candles nearly a year after his brutal killing by Minneapolis police. Photo: Getty Images

“There’s something called racial battle fatigue, and it is the exhaustion that comes from event after event, assault after assault,” says Thema Bryant-Davis, a professor of psychology at Pepperdine University and the director of the university’s Culture and Trauma Research Center. “Because although this milestone is very significant, there have been many others right before that and after that.”

Death at the hands of police has not stopped. Since May 26, 2020 — the day after former officer Derek Chauvin killed Floyd —…


Academia holds Black women to an arbitrary standard

Nikole Hannah-Jones poses for “Vanity Fair.” Photo: Levi Walton

I see my work as forcing us to confront our hypocrisy, forcing us to confront the truth that we would rather ignore.

As a trailblazer searching…


Enough with playing it nice and safe in the fight against anti-Blackness.

Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images

While following the Derek Chauvin trial, I’ve noticed one common theme that also struck me immediately following the gruesome killing of George Floyd — White people speaking out against racism after the fact. It seems that a healthy handful of White folks wait to express their outrage and disgust over racial injustice after a highly publicized or sensationalized tragedy takes place. Often, after a new hashtag begins trending on social media, a variety of tweets and posts speaking out against anti-Blackness and anti-Black violence soon follow. Which, I suppose, is fine, but very few extend far beyond their comfort zone…


Systemic racism persists in policing, and we cannot become complacent

Photo: Caitlin Ochs/Reuters

Each generation of Black people sees people who look like them killed by police brutality. My brother once told me, “I’m more afraid of them than criminals.” Ever since he became a preteen, police officers have followed him around in stores. We discussed these events — the loss of his innocence in their eyes.

And he…


We need more than one guilty verdict to change America

Angela Harrelson, the aunt of George Floyd, speaks at George Floyd Square after the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial on April 20, 2021, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Every once in a while, there is an event that is so graphic, so inhumane, that it makes society take pause, asking itself “Who are we? What do we stand for?” and…

ZORA

Bold, yet refined. A publication from Medium for Black women.

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